Meet the Massey Lectures App

Hello world.

Uncover the full legacy and history of the Massey Lectures Series, from 1961 to today. Learn more about selected Massey authors, their lives, achievements, and beliefs. Explore the complex web of themes within the Massey universe, and hear unique thoughts and insights from the lecturers themselves. And then contribute to the conversation yourself.

 

Download the Free Massey Lectures App

 



 “The Massey Lectures series is so unique and special. The Massey Lectures iPad app further engages with the audience and livens up the conversation, supporting the original format beyond what it was capable of before.”

— Renowned author Lawrence Hill, 2013 Massey Lecturer

For more than 50 years, the annual Massey Lecture series, broadcast on CBC Radio’s IDEAS, has brought contemporary thinkers with unique perspectives and experiences to a national and international audience. Notable Massey Lecturers include Northrop Frye, Noam Chomsky, Margaret Atwood, Doris Lessing, Stephen Lewis, Thomas King, Margaret Somerville, and Wade Davis to name but a few.

During the week of the rebroadcast of Lawrence Hill’s Massey Lectures, Blood, on CBC Radio’s IDEAS, House of Anansi in co-operation with the CBC and Massey College, and with the support of the Ontario Media Development Corporation, unveils its first iPad app. Now available for free in the iTunes App Store, the Massey Lectures iPad app lets readers explore some of the most complex and thought-provoking topics of our age, and reveals the depth and breadth of Canada’s preeminent public lectures series in a totally new way. The app includes nearly 200 hours of text, audio lectures, interviews, talks, and exclusive footage.


Massey Sets

For the first time, the audio and text of selected lectures are brought together in one specially priced package available for purchase within the app. Each selected Massey Lectures e-book is illuminated with vibrant images and videos and includes the five-hour audio lectures. At launch, the app adds nearly 40 pieces of additional video and audio content. Also available for the first time are curated bundles of books and lectures that are divided by connected ideas across lectures called “themes,” such as “Constructing and Deconstructing Identity” and “Rationalizing the Truth.”


Watch the app in action

 


About the Massey Lectures Series

 

The Massey Lectures Series was created in honour of the Right Honourable Vincent Massey, former Governor General of Canada, and was inaugurated in 1961 to provide a forum on radio where major contemporary thinkers could address the important issues of the day. Each year a noted scholar or public figure is invited to give a series of topical lectures. The Massey Lectures are co-sponsored by CBC Radio, House of Anansi Press, and Massey College in the University of Toronto. For more information, go to cbc.ca/masseys.

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The Massey App is created by House of Anansi in co-operation with the CBC and Massey College, and with the support of the Ontario Media Development Corporation. The Massey Lectures iPad App was concepted, designed and developed by Critical Mass, a global digital marketing agency.

 

THE DRAGON HEAD OF HONG KONG: The Ava Lee Prequel [guest post by Ian Hamilton]

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“Every hero has an origin story — this is the one Ava Lee fans have been waiting for!”

— Robert J. Wiersema, author of Before I Wake


I’ve always had a story arc in my mind for Ava and Uncle, but it was one that moved their lives forward, never back. It was never part of my plan to write a prequel. Then in September 2012, at the Kitchener, Ontario literary event called Word on the Street, I was approached by a man who had read all the books in the series.

“Have you ever thought of writing a prequel?” he asked. “I’d love to know how Ava and Uncle first connected.”

“That’s a great idea,” I said.

Then I began to remember other readers at other events asking similar questions. The idea of a prequel took root.

In the winter of 2012–2013, as I was finishing the edits to The Scottish Banker of Surabaya and writing The Two Sisters of Borneo, I found myself distracted by thoughts about Ava’s early life. She was in her mid-twenties, just out of school, living in a tiny apartment in Richmond Hill, and struggling to establish her career. Then dialogue began to pop into my head as I was driving or lying in bed. Uncle and Ava were speaking to each other for the very first time. It was their initial meeting and conversation, and they were feeling each other out, tip-toeing towards the formation of a partnership.

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Girls with Grit: read the winning story!

Phoebe by Maya LannenGroundwood Books’ Girls With Grit novels share real girls’ voices, and their stories, from North America and around the world. In these books, ordinary girls overcome obstacles, make their voices heard, and stand up for what they believe in.

Groundwood’s partnership with Figment was driven by the desire to seek out stories written by teens that reflected their view of the world — demonstrating that every girl is capable of amazing feats of grit.
Figment and Groundwood received hundreds of entries to their Girls with Grit contest, but one very unique story stood out from the rest. Phoebe is that unique story.

Told from the point of view of a young woman at odds with her own mind, Phoebe demonstrates the power of friendship and personal strength to overcome great obstacles.
Groundwood is proud to present this special e-book edition of Maya Lannen’s Phoebe.

Download it here!

Read more about the contests and our finalists.

Nicole Chin on Shooting the Bitch

978-1-77089-485-3_lI began writing Shooting the Bitch last year on an especially long train ride from Oakville to Ottawa. It was summer, and I was on my way to visit my boyfriend at the time. He lived in the rural area of Ottawa on a farm with his parents and their two dogs. I was raised in the suburbs, so visiting that farm became a novelty that I relished.

It was one of my travels to Ottawa that inspired the concept of Shooting the Bitch. I was on the train looking out the window as we approached Fallowfield, watching the houses whip by. I saw a boy, probably no older than thirteen, standing in his backyard as the sunset behind him. He was standing in the opposite corner from a golden retriever in the backyard. Their shadows were melding with the shade of a tree. The screen door to their house had been left open. The boy was standing in a position with his shoulders rolling forward in a way that made him look incredibly morose. That image seared itself into my brain. I don’t know why. It wasn’t special and it happened in probably half a minute. Yet as soon as it happened, I began to write what would be the first half of Shooting the Bitch.

When I arrived in Ottawa, my boyfriend picked me up and drove me to the farm. When we got to the farm, I found out that my favourite of their dogs was having difficulty walking and eating. My boyfriend told me that the dog was going to die soon. I remember being surprised at how he had said that in such a detached, nonchalant way. I know he felt sad, but he didn’t show it.

My boyfriend and I were approaching an emotional speed bump when I finally got down to finishing Shooting the Bitch. I had been struggling with the ending for a while, but I had to submit a piece of writing for a workshop in one of my creative writing classes the next day. I had tried to write different endings before, but none of them had ever felt right. When I began to work on the story again, I was in a different emotional place. It was the beginning of my fourth year, and at the end of the summer I had seen my estranged father for the first time in five years. The experience had been especially hard on me, and it had made me reflect on my own relationship with my father. When I began to work on Shooting the Bitch again, it fell into place within the afternoon. The ending didn’t feel like something I had to think about or figure out, but it felt more like a reflex to what had happened recently. It was the culmination of those two events, as well as that one train ride that sparked what would become the final ending of Shooting the Bitch.

— Nicole Chin


25441e7Short, sharp, and unexpectedly disturbing, “Shooting the Bitch” is the award-winning story from newcomer, and former Anansi intern, Nicole Chin.

The big unveil: our Girls with Grit contest cover

Groundwood Books’ Girls With Grit novels share real girls’ voices, and their stories, from North America and around the world. In these books, ordinary girls overcome obstacles, make their voices heard, and stand up for what they believe in.

In 2012, Groundwood partnered  with Figment, an online community for people who love to share their writing, connect with others who like to read, and discover new stories and authors. This partnership was driven by the desire to seek out stories written by teens that reflected their view of the world — demonstrating that every girl is capable of amazing feats of grit.

Figment and Groundwood received hundreds of entries to their Girls with Grit contest, but one stood out from the rest. Told from the point of view of a young woman at odds with her own mind, Phoebe demonstrates how friendship and personal strength can be harnessed to allow a person to overcome great obstacles.

Groundwood is proud to present the cover for Maya Lannen’s Phoebe. Watch our blog for a special e-book edition of Maya’s story, available next week.

Phoebe by Maya Lannen

Get a Little Summer Lovin’ From Pasha Malla [Anansi Digital]

To Sweep the Light by Pasha Malla - Anansi Digital

 

House of Anansi is proud to announce the first digital release of our seasonal reading list. It’s a summer love story entitled To Sweep the Light by Pasha Malla. To Sweep the Light follows two lonely people who spend a summer in the North not finding each other. In typical Malla style, the story’s spare prose is complemented by lush and complex emotions. It’s about solitude and companionship, proximity and distance, and the quest for intimacy between a boy and a girl.

Anansi Digital will publish a piece of fiction and non-fiction each month. Following the release of Malla’s To Sweep the Light, we’ll release political thinker James Laxer’s timely essay A House Divided: Watching America’s Descent into Civil Conflict. In July, we have Last Ham, a piece of short fiction by Gemini Award-winning filmmaker Joel McConvey, followed by Travels Through the Golden State, a second nonfiction work by James Laxer.

 

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The Broken Social Scene Story Contest Launches Today

The BSS Story Contest

Start your engines, writers! The Broken Social Scene Story Contest: Short Works Inspired by You Forgot It In People opens today! Pick any song title from Broken Social Scene’s first album You Forgot It In People and use it as the title or theme for a short story. The contest celebrates record label Arts & Crafts’ ten-year anniversary, and specifically honours You Forgot It In People, the acclaimed album that launched the record label and caused a sensation worldwide.

Prizes:

The top thirteen short stories will be published as The Broken Social Scene Story Project: Short Works Inspired by You Forgot It In People on June 8, 2013 as an eBook, powered by Anansi Digital, under House of Anansi’s new short story imprint Astoria. The top three stories will also receive cash prizes, VIP passes to Field Trip Music & Arts Festival, and House of Anansi and Arts & Crafts swag. Ten runners-up will receive Anansi and Arts & Crafts swag.

Jurors:

Broken Social Scene members Brendan Canning, Leslie Feist, and Charles Spearin and House of Anansi Senior Editor Jared Bland.

Key dates:

  • Contest deadline: March 29, 2013
  • 13 finalists announced: May 24, 2013
  • Top 3 winners announced: May 30, 2013
  • The Broken Social Scene Story Project: Short Works Inspired by You Forgot It In People eBook publication date: June 8, 2013

More details available at http://www.houseofanansi.com/bssstorycontest